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Introduction to Islamic banking and finance /

by Kettell, Brian.
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Wiley finance series: Publisher: Chichester, U.K. : John Wiley & Sons Inc., c2011Description: xv,174 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780470978047; 047097804X.Subject(s): Banks and banking -- Islamic countries | Finance -- Islamic countries
Contents:
1 Muslim beliefs -- 1.1 Five pillars of faith -- 1.2 Six Islamic creeds -- 1.3 Belief in Allah and his attributes -- 1.4 Belief in destiny -- 1.5 Belief in angels -- 1.6 Belief in apostles -- 1.7 Belief in the revealed books -- 1.8 Belief in the hereafter -- 2 Sharia'a law and Sharia'a boards: roles, responsibility and membership -- 2.1 Definition of the Sharia'a -- 2.2 Allah is the law giver -- 2.3 Objectives of the Sharia'a -- 2.4 Sources of the Sharia'a -- 2.5 Sharia'a Islamic investment principles -- 2.6 Conditions for investment in shares -- 2.7 Sharia'a supervisory board (ssb) -- 2.8 Sharia'a board scholar qualifications -- 2.9 State bank of Pakistan (sbp): proper criteria for appointment of Sharia'a advisors -- 3 Definition of Islamic banking -- 3.1 Conventional bankers and Islamic banking -- 3.2 Six key Islamic banking principles -- 3.3 Definition of asymmetric information -- 3.4 Origins of asymmetric risk within Islamic banking -- 3.5 Riba in the Qur'an and Sunnah or Hadith -- 3.6 Five reasons for the prohibition ofRiba -- 4 Murabaha as a mode of Islamic finance -- 4.1 Murabaha transactions -- 4.2 What makes Murabaha Sharia'a compliant? -- 4.3 Islam treats money and commodities differently4.4 Murabaha and the Sharia'a -- 4.5 Practicalities of implementing Murabaha -- 4.6 Sharia'a rules concerning Murabaha -- 4.7 Reasoning behind Sharia'a rules -- 4.8 Practical examples of the application of Murabaha -- 4.9 Key issues associated with Murabaha -- 4.10 comparison of Murabaha with interest-based finance -- 4.11 Murabaha differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 4.12 Summary -- Reference -- 5 Mudaraba as a mode of Islamic finance -- 5.1 Definition of Mudaraba -- 5.2 What makes Mudaraba Sharia'a compliant? -- 5.3 Practicalities of implementing Mudaraba -- 5.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Mudaraba -- 5.5 Practical examples of Mudaraba -- 5.6 Key issues associated with Mudaraba -- 5.7 Comparison of Mudaraba with the conventional banking equivalent -- 5.8 Mudaraba : differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 5.9 Summary -- Reference -- 6 Musharaka as a mode of Islamic finance -- 6.1 Definition of Musharaka -- 6.2 What makes Musharaka Sharia'a compliant? -- 6.3 Practicalities of implementing Musharaka. 6.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Musharaka. -- 6.5 practical examples of Musharaka. -- 6.6 problems associated with Musharaka. -- 6.7 Comparison of Musharaka with the conventional banking equivalent -- 6.8 Summary -- Reference. -- 7 Ijara as a mode of Islamic finance -- 7.1 Definition of Ijara -- 7.2 What makes Ijara Sharia'a compliant? -- 7.3 Practicalities of implementing Ijara -- 7.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Ijara -- 7.5 Basic rules of Islamic leasing -- 7.6 Practical examples of Ijara -- 7.7 Key differences between an Ijara contract and a conventional lease -- 7.8 Comparison of Ijara with the conventional banking equivalent -- 7.9 Ijara: differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 7.10 Summary -- Reference -- 8 Istisna'a as a mode of Islamic finance. -- 8.1 Definition of Istisna'a -- 8.2 What makes Istisna'a Sharia'a compliant? -- 8.3 Practicalities of implementing Istisna'a -- 8.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Istisna'a -- 8.5 Practical examples of Istisna'a -- 8.6 key issues associated with Istisna'a -- 8.7 comparison of Istisna'a with the conventional banking equivalent -- 8.8 Istisna'a: differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 8.9 Summary -- Reference -- 9 Salam as a mode of Islamic finance. 9.1 Definition of Salam -- 9.2 What makes Salam Sharia'a compliant? -- 9.3 Practicalities of implementing Salam -- 9.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Salam. -- 9.5 Sharia'a rules concerning parallel Salam -- 9.6 practical examples of Salam. -- 9.7 Benefits of the Salam contract. -- 9.8 Problems associated with Salam -- 9.9 Comparison of Salam with the conventional banking equivalent -- 9.10 Salam: differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 9.11 Summary -- Reference. -- 10 Takaful: Islamic insurance. -- 10.1 Case for Islamic insurance. -- 10.2 Islamic issues with conventional insurance -- 10.3 Definition and concept of Takaful -- 10.4 Islamic origins of Takaful -- 10.5 Where insurance fits within Isalam -- 10.6 Definition of the parties to a Takaful -- 10.7 Takaful in practice -- 10.8 Takaful and conventional insurance -- 10.9 alternative models of Takaful -- 10.10 Sharia'a law as applied by Takaful operators -- 10.11 Takaful operators -- 10.12 Definition of reTakaful (reinsurance) -- 10.13 reTakaful -- 10.14 Role of the Sharia'a board in Takaful -- Appendix 1. Comparative features of Islamic financing techniques -- A.1 Nature of the financing -- A.2 Role of the finance provider in the management/use of funds. -- A.3 Risk bearing by the finance provider -- A.4 Uncertainty of the rate of return on capital for the finance provider. -- A.5 Cost of capital for the finance user -- A.6 Relationship between the cost of capital and the rate of return on capital -- Appendix 2. Top 500 Islamic institutions -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: Guide to the key characteristics of Islamic banking highlighting how these differ from conventional banking. List(s) this item appears in: Finance
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Item type Location Collection Call number Copy Status Date due Item holds
Books Books
Lahore Business School Library
Shelf No. 18, LBS
Book 332.1091767 KET-I 2011 805985 (Browse shelf) C1 Available
Books Books
Lahore Business School Library
Shelf No. 18, LBS
Book 332.1091767 KET-I 2011 814748 (Browse shelf) C2 Available
Books Books
Lahore Business School Library
Shelf No. 18, LBS
Book 332.1091767 KET-I 2011 814749 (Browse shelf) C3 Available
Books Books
Lahore Business School Library
Shelf No. 18, LBS
Book 332.1091767 KET-I 2011 814750 (Browse shelf) C4 Available
Books Books
Lahore Business School Library
Shelf No. 18, LBS
Book 332.1091767 KET-I 2011 814751 (Browse shelf) C5 Available
Reference Reference
Lahore Business School Library
Shelf No. 18, LBS
Book 332.1091767 KET-I 2011 814752 (Browse shelf) C6 Not For Loan (Restricted Access)
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [157]-164) and index.

1 Muslim beliefs -- 1.1 Five pillars of faith -- 1.2 Six Islamic creeds -- 1.3 Belief in Allah and his attributes -- 1.4 Belief in destiny -- 1.5 Belief in angels -- 1.6 Belief in apostles -- 1.7 Belief in the revealed books -- 1.8 Belief in the hereafter -- 2 Sharia'a law and Sharia'a boards: roles, responsibility and membership -- 2.1 Definition of the Sharia'a -- 2.2 Allah is the law giver -- 2.3 Objectives of the Sharia'a -- 2.4 Sources of the Sharia'a -- 2.5 Sharia'a Islamic investment principles -- 2.6 Conditions for investment in shares -- 2.7 Sharia'a supervisory board (ssb) -- 2.8 Sharia'a board scholar qualifications -- 2.9 State bank of Pakistan (sbp): proper criteria for appointment of Sharia'a advisors -- 3 Definition of Islamic banking -- 3.1 Conventional bankers and Islamic banking -- 3.2 Six key Islamic banking principles -- 3.3 Definition of asymmetric information -- 3.4 Origins of asymmetric risk within Islamic banking -- 3.5 Riba in the Qur'an and Sunnah or Hadith -- 3.6 Five reasons for the prohibition ofRiba -- 4 Murabaha as a mode of Islamic finance -- 4.1 Murabaha transactions -- 4.2 What makes Murabaha Sharia'a compliant? -- 4.3 Islam treats money and commodities differently4.4 Murabaha and the Sharia'a -- 4.5 Practicalities of implementing Murabaha -- 4.6 Sharia'a rules concerning Murabaha -- 4.7 Reasoning behind Sharia'a rules -- 4.8 Practical examples of the application of Murabaha -- 4.9 Key issues associated with Murabaha -- 4.10 comparison of Murabaha with interest-based finance -- 4.11 Murabaha differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 4.12 Summary -- Reference -- 5 Mudaraba as a mode of Islamic finance -- 5.1 Definition of Mudaraba -- 5.2 What makes Mudaraba Sharia'a compliant? -- 5.3 Practicalities of implementing Mudaraba -- 5.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Mudaraba -- 5.5 Practical examples of Mudaraba -- 5.6 Key issues associated with Mudaraba -- 5.7 Comparison of Mudaraba with the conventional banking equivalent -- 5.8 Mudaraba : differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 5.9 Summary -- Reference -- 6 Musharaka as a mode of Islamic finance -- 6.1 Definition of Musharaka -- 6.2 What makes Musharaka Sharia'a compliant? -- 6.3 Practicalities of implementing Musharaka. 6.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Musharaka. -- 6.5 practical examples of Musharaka. -- 6.6 problems associated with Musharaka. -- 6.7 Comparison of Musharaka with the conventional banking equivalent -- 6.8 Summary -- Reference. -- 7 Ijara as a mode of Islamic finance -- 7.1 Definition of Ijara -- 7.2 What makes Ijara Sharia'a compliant? -- 7.3 Practicalities of implementing Ijara -- 7.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Ijara -- 7.5 Basic rules of Islamic leasing -- 7.6 Practical examples of Ijara -- 7.7 Key differences between an Ijara contract and a conventional lease -- 7.8 Comparison of Ijara with the conventional banking equivalent -- 7.9 Ijara: differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 7.10 Summary -- Reference -- 8 Istisna'a as a mode of Islamic finance. -- 8.1 Definition of Istisna'a -- 8.2 What makes Istisna'a Sharia'a compliant? -- 8.3 Practicalities of implementing Istisna'a -- 8.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Istisna'a -- 8.5 Practical examples of Istisna'a -- 8.6 key issues associated with Istisna'a -- 8.7 comparison of Istisna'a with the conventional banking equivalent -- 8.8 Istisna'a: differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 8.9 Summary -- Reference -- 9 Salam as a mode of Islamic finance. 9.1 Definition of Salam -- 9.2 What makes Salam Sharia'a compliant? -- 9.3 Practicalities of implementing Salam -- 9.4 Sharia'a rules concerning Salam. -- 9.5 Sharia'a rules concerning parallel Salam -- 9.6 practical examples of Salam. -- 9.7 Benefits of the Salam contract. -- 9.8 Problems associated with Salam -- 9.9 Comparison of Salam with the conventional banking equivalent -- 9.10 Salam: differences from the other Islamic financing techniques -- 9.11 Summary -- Reference. -- 10 Takaful: Islamic insurance. -- 10.1 Case for Islamic insurance. -- 10.2 Islamic issues with conventional insurance -- 10.3 Definition and concept of Takaful -- 10.4 Islamic origins of Takaful -- 10.5 Where insurance fits within Isalam -- 10.6 Definition of the parties to a Takaful -- 10.7 Takaful in practice -- 10.8 Takaful and conventional insurance -- 10.9 alternative models of Takaful -- 10.10 Sharia'a law as applied by Takaful operators -- 10.11 Takaful operators -- 10.12 Definition of reTakaful (reinsurance) -- 10.13 reTakaful -- 10.14 Role of the Sharia'a board in Takaful -- Appendix 1. Comparative features of Islamic financing techniques -- A.1 Nature of the financing -- A.2 Role of the finance provider in the management/use of funds. -- A.3 Risk bearing by the finance provider -- A.4 Uncertainty of the rate of return on capital for the finance provider. -- A.5 Cost of capital for the finance user -- A.6 Relationship between the cost of capital and the rate of return on capital -- Appendix 2. Top 500 Islamic institutions -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index.

Guide to the key characteristics of Islamic banking highlighting how these differ from conventional banking.

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